Ducks Acquire Pelley & Fraser

Just because there are no Ducks games until Wednesday does not mean that Anaheim is spending time sleeping. 

In a move that should come as no surprise, the Ducks traded away defenseman Kurtis Foster and minor league goaltender Timo Pielmeier to the New Jersey Devils.   Foster had spent a good chunk of time as a healthy scratch after recovering from surgery to remove a wire from his thigh.  The quirky injury prevented Foster from participating in training camp and once recovered, he never really made a solid impression, playing in only nine games for Anaheim.

The Ducks had recalled Nate Guenin from Syracuse and Guenin has been getting the ice time since.  With Lubomir Visnovsky getting ready to come back from having broken his finger, Foster was becoming more and more obsolete.  Not to mention expensive with a $1.8 million contract.

“It wasn’t going to work out,” said GM Bob Murray. “Vish is coming back. It was just time to move him on and [he can] get an opportunity. “

Pielmeier was acquired from the San Jose Sharks along with Nick Bonino in a trade that sent Kent Huskins and Travis Moen up north in 2009.  Pielmeier had much promise, but has never seemed to develop that talent. 

In exchange, the Ducks get center Rod Pelley and defenseman Mark Fraser.  They also receive a 7th round selection in the 2012 NHL Entry Draft.

Pelley, 27, has appeared in 211 career NHL games with New Jersey.  He is bound to cause some confusion on the ice when Devante Smith-Pelly is playing, and broadcasters and announcers can only hope they aren’t on the same line.

“He’s an intelligent centerman who can bring some energy to our group intelligently,” was Murray’s assessment.

Fraser, 25, has played 98 career NHL contests with the Devils.  Neither Fraser nor Pelley have scored this year and both are pretty inexpensive with $550,000 contracts.

In other news:  Jean Francois Jacques added more frequent flyer miles when he was sent back to Syracuse.

About Karen Francis

Just a diehard Ducks fan since 1995, when the team filled the hockey shaped vacuum in my heart.

Quantcast